arth207-spring:

Barbara Kruger: Untitled (We Will No Longer Be Seen and Not Heard), 1985, lithograph on paper support, Post-Modernism
Kruger was an American conceptual artist, designer and writer. She examined the relationships and likeness between photographic and mass-media images in her works. Kruger also researched into iconography and slogans, deconstructing them visually and verbally. She uses aggressive text. Some of her works also touched on the major influences in films, television, and other stereotypical situations of everyday life. It also tends to have viewers question themselves about feminism, classicism, consumerism, individual autonomy and desire.
“Barbara Kruger.” Art21. Art21, Inc. Web. 28 May. 2013. <http://www.pbs.org/art21/artists/barbara-kruger>
“Kruger, Barbara.” Grove Art Online. Oxford Art Online. Oxford University Press. Web. 28 May. 2013. <http://0-www.oxfordartonline.com.library.scad.edu/subscriber/article/grove/art/T048097>.

arth207-spring:

Barbara Kruger: Untitled (We Will No Longer Be Seen and Not Heard), 1985, lithograph on paper support, Post-Modernism

Kruger was an American conceptual artist, designer and writer. She examined the relationships and likeness between photographic and mass-media images in her works. Kruger also researched into iconography and slogans, deconstructing them visually and verbally. She uses aggressive text. Some of her works also touched on the major influences in films, television, and other stereotypical situations of everyday life. It also tends to have viewers question themselves about feminism, classicism, consumerism, individual autonomy and desire.

“Barbara Kruger.” Art21. Art21, Inc. Web. 28 May. 2013. <http://www.pbs.org/art21/artists/barbara-kruger>

“Kruger, Barbara.” Grove Art Online. Oxford Art Online. Oxford University Press. Web. 28 May. 2013. <http://0-www.oxfordartonline.com.library.scad.edu/subscriber/article/grove/art/T048097>.

This was posted 1 year ago. It has 16 notes. .
arth207-spring:

Eva Hesse, “Accession II,” 1967/69, galvanized steel with plastic tubing, Post-Minimalism
Eva Hessa made a series of works named Accession. This was her second one. It was very different than her first. Accession II used industrial fabrication techniques and was her first fabricated sculpture. Similar to many Post-Minimalist artists, she used hand-made techniques to give human characteristics to her works. In this case, Hesse filled 30,760 holes by hand with plastic tubing. This gave the whole series the human characteristic of the female genitalia. The obsessive hand-threading of tubing contrasted sharply with the machine fabrication of the external structures. In addition, the contrast and human characteristic allows viewers and critics to question her work of “What is art?”. This was Hesse’s goal. It was her dream and deepest wishes to move beyond what was considered sculpture.
A year before she died. she said in 1969,
“I remember I wanted to get to non art, non connotive, non anthropomorphic, non geometric, non nothing, everthing, but of another kind, vision, sort. from a total other reference point. is it possible?” (Hessa 17).
Hesse Eva. Eva Hesse. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2002. Print.
Sussman, Elisabeth, and Fred Wasserman. Eva Hesse: Sculpture. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2006. Print.

arth207-spring:

Eva Hesse, “Accession II,” 1967/69, galvanized steel with plastic tubing, Post-Minimalism


Eva Hessa made a series of works named Accession. This was her second one. It was very different than her first. Accession II used industrial fabrication techniques and was her first fabricated sculpture. Similar to many Post-Minimalist artists, she used hand-made techniques to give human characteristics to her works. In this case, Hesse filled 30,760 holes by hand with plastic tubing. This gave the whole series the human characteristic of the female genitalia. The obsessive hand-threading of tubing contrasted sharply with the machine fabrication of the external structures. In addition, the contrast and human characteristic allows viewers and critics to question her work of “What is art?”. This was Hesse’s goal. It was her dream and deepest wishes to move beyond what was considered sculpture.

A year before she died. she said in 1969,

“I remember I wanted to get to non art, non connotive, non anthropomorphic, non geometric, non nothing, everthing, but of another kind, vision, sort. from a total other reference point. is it possible?” (Hessa 17).

Hesse Eva. Eva Hesse. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2002. Print.

Sussman, Elisabeth, and Fred Wasserman. Eva Hesse: Sculpture. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2006. Print.

This was posted 1 year ago. It has 7 notes. .

arth207-spring:

Eva Hesse, “Right After,” 1969, Latex over rope, string and wire, Post Minimalism


This was one of two of Eva Hesse’s pieces hung from the ceiling. It was a collaboration with Doug John. At the time, Hesse was very ill with a brain tumor. She dipped one to two hundred feet lengths of fiberglass cord into buckets of latex and hung it on S-shaped hooks cut from ordinary clothes hangers. Hesse suspended the piece in the air from the ceiling to dry. At the time, She was one of few artist that experimented with latex and was not sure what would happen. The latex would either drip off the piece or dry and stick to it.

Right After caught everyone’s attention. It was completely hand made and used materials from everyday life, which was very different from Minimalism. A characteristic, many Post-Minimalist artists did. From afar, Right After has a weightless and droopy effect. Right After was moved from gallery to gallery which disturbed Hesse because she wasn’t sure what the exact changes would be during each transition. When she was made the piece, she believed her studio was part of her art and putting Right After into a gallery would only change people’s perspective. Hesse didn’t like how galleries used dramatic lighting effects. These lighting effects would unfortunately take away the shadows she would see in her studio.

Hesse Eva. Eva Hesse. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2002. Print.

Sussman, Elisabeth, and Fred Wasserman. Eva Hesse: Sculpture. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2006. Print.

WhitneyFocus. “Singular Visions: Eva Hesse, No Title, 1970.” YouTube. Web. 6 May. 2013. <http://www.youtube.com/watch?v= LklUuaUxX4k>

 

This was posted 1 year ago. It has 1 note.
arth207-spring:

Cindy Sherman, Untitled Film Still #21, 1978, Gelatin Silver Print, Feminism
Cindy Sherman was an American photographer. When she was growing up, she was inspired by the television and fascinated by make-up. She believed photography would be the best medium to express herself.
Cindy Sherman was famous for her film stills. Photographs such as Untitiled Film Still #21 is 1 of 130 film stills. These photographs of herself, were specifically created to manipulate the appearance of a film still. They also raised mass-media stereotypes found in film making and advertising. She wanted each photo to appear as if it came from a story and they were all of herself. Because of her childhood inspirations, she loved to dress up and use make-up. Sherman’s work was very mysterious. She did not explain the meaning behind her art and named them “untitled”. Therefore, it was open up to the viewers to determine Sherman’s story behind her 130 film stills.
Véronique Pittolo. “Sherman, Cindy.” Grove Art Online. Oxford Art Online. Oxford University Press. Web. 12 May. 2013. &lt;http://0-www.oxfordartonline.com.library.scad.edu/subscriber/article/grove/art/T078200&gt;.
Lindsay, Shana, and Harris, Beth. “Sherman’s Untitled Film Still #21” smarthistory. Khanacademy. Web. 12 May 2013. &lt;http://smarthistory.khanacademy.org/cindy-sherman.html&gt;

arth207-spring:

Cindy Sherman, Untitled Film Still #21, 1978, Gelatin Silver Print, Feminism

Cindy Sherman was an American photographer. When she was growing up, she was inspired by the television and fascinated by make-up. She believed photography would be the best medium to express herself.

Cindy Sherman was famous for her film stills. Photographs such as Untitiled Film Still #21 is 1 of 130 film stills. These photographs of herself, were specifically created to manipulate the appearance of a film still. They also raised mass-media stereotypes found in film making and advertising. She wanted each photo to appear as if it came from a story and they were all of herself. Because of her childhood inspirations, she loved to dress up and use make-up. Sherman’s work was very mysterious. She did not explain the meaning behind her art and named them “untitled”. Therefore, it was open up to the viewers to determine Sherman’s story behind her 130 film stills.

Véronique Pittolo. “Sherman, Cindy.” Grove Art Online. Oxford Art Online. Oxford University Press. Web. 12 May. 2013. <http://0-www.oxfordartonline.com.library.scad.edu/subscriber/article/grove/art/T078200>.

Lindsay, Shana, and Harris, Beth. “Sherman’s Untitled Film Still #21” smarthistory. Khanacademy. Web. 12 May 2013. <http://smarthistory.khanacademy.org/cindy-sherman.html>

This was posted 1 year ago. It has 6 notes. .
Art History 207: HAJI Gallery Review

arth207-spring:

I visited HAJI Gallery on 12-14 Lok Ku Road, Sheung Wan. They were presenting an exhibition called “The Next Big Name” by Dicky Manana, a photographer. When I walked in, the gallery was mainly white with his photographs displayed on the walls.

Dicky is a fashion, portrait and commercial…

This was posted 1 year ago. It has 2 notes.

arth207-spring:

Louise Bourgeois, Cumul I, 1969, white marble on wood base, Abstract Expressionism

Bourgeois’ work tended to be very abstract and descriptive. They usually included metaphors of male and female body parts. Bourgeois’ art was deeply personal, confusing, troubling, yet magical and wonderful. She believed three-dimensional forms could express the meaning behind each of her artworks.

Cumul I was part of a series of her works. Cumulus refered to the forms of rounded clouds. When viewers look at Cumul I, they are confronted with clusters of breasts and penises which emerged from a rippled fabric. To many, this was considered disturbing. Bourgeois explained she was inspired by her traumatizing childhood and confirmed that all her work was an inspiration from her childhood.

Schifman, Karen. “Louise Bourgeois’s Cumul I.” smarthistory. Khanacademy. Web. 4 May 2013. <http://smarthistory.khanacademy.org/louise-bourgeoiss-cumul-i.html>

This was posted 1 year ago. It has 7 notes.
arth207-spring:

Pablo Picasso: Still-life with a Bottle of Rum, 1911, oil on canvas, Cubism
Cubism was a modern movement and evolved rapidly. The movement had two stages: Analytic Cubism, where forms are analyzed and fragmented; and Synthetic Cubism, where materials are collaged on a canvas for synthetic signs.
This painting, the Still-life with a Bottle of Rum, was one of Picasso’s analytical cubism paintings. The painting was abstract and fragmented. It was a place for discovery. The painting had facets that seem to deplete of their substance, leaving a fragmented overlapping of planes. Picasso also experimented with typography. The painting is rather difficult to interpret with the discontinuity of figurative fragments.
Melissa McQuillan. “Picasso, Pablo.” Grove Art Online. Oxford Art Online. Oxford University Press. Web. 24 Apr. 2013. &lt;http://0-www.oxfordartonline.com.library.scad.edu/subscriber/article/grove/art/T067316&gt;.

arth207-spring:

Pablo Picasso: Still-life with a Bottle of Rum, 1911, oil on canvas, Cubism

Cubism was a modern movement and evolved rapidly. The movement had two stages: Analytic Cubism, where forms are analyzed and fragmented; and Synthetic Cubism, where materials are collaged on a canvas for synthetic signs.

This painting, the Still-life with a Bottle of Rum, was one of Picasso’s analytical cubism paintings. The painting was abstract and fragmented. It was a place for discovery. The painting had facets that seem to deplete of their substance, leaving a fragmented overlapping of planes. Picasso also experimented with typography. The painting is rather difficult to interpret with the discontinuity of figurative fragments.

Melissa McQuillan. “Picasso, Pablo.” Grove Art Online. Oxford Art Online. Oxford University Press. Web. 24 Apr. 2013. <http://0-www.oxfordartonline.com.library.scad.edu/subscriber/article/grove/art/T067316>.

This was posted 1 year ago. It has 1 note. .
arth207-spring:

Umberto Boccioni, The City Rises, 1910, Oil on canvas, FuturismBoccioni was one of the most influential and famous Italian Futurist artist at the time. He helped develop and influence the movement by introducing a dynamic Cubist-like style. He began as a painter and later experimented with sculptures. The City Rises was considered to be the very first truly Futurist painting. The painting is very dynamic. The horse and human figures are blurred to represent rapid movement in a war scene. The dynamic colors add vivid contrast as if blood is being shed.
A quote from Boccioni:"To paint a human figure you must not paint it; you must render the whole of its surrounding atmosphere." (Wolf)
Wolf, Justin. “Umberto Boccioni.” TheArtStory.Org &lt;http://www.theartstory.org/artist-boccioni-umberto.htm&gt;

arth207-spring:

Umberto Boccioni, The City Rises, 1910, Oil on canvas, Futurism

Boccioni was one of the most influential and famous Italian Futurist artist at the time. He helped develop and influence the movement by introducing a dynamic Cubist-like style. He began as a painter and later experimented with sculptures. The City Rises was considered to be the very first truly Futurist painting. The painting is very dynamic. The horse and human figures are blurred to represent rapid movement in a war scene. The dynamic colors add vivid contrast as if blood is being shed.

A quote from Boccioni:
"To paint a human figure you must not paint it; you must render the whole of its surrounding atmosphere." (Wolf)

Wolf, Justin. “Umberto Boccioni.” TheArtStory.Org <http://www.theartstory.org/artist-boccioni-umberto.htm>

This was posted 1 year ago. It has 3 notes. .
arth207-spring:

Gino Severini, Dynamic Hieroglyph of the Bal Tabarin, 1912, oil on canvas, FuturismSeverini had visited artists such as Picasso, whom greatly influenced him. Severini used the cubism technique into his style of painting. During this period, Severini&#8217;s painting became increasingly abstract and he emphasized energy by choosing images of movement in space. This painting was similar to a cubism collage and has lots of colors. The painting was of a bunch of people at a cafe. It was a representation of the Paris nightlife. The painting has many large, swinging curves of rapid motion. The woman was supposed to be swirling around. 
Ester Coen. &#8220;Severini, Gino.&#8221; Grove Art Online. Oxford Art Online. Oxford University Press. Web. 24 Apr. 2013. &lt;http://0-www.oxfordartonline.com.library.scad.edu/subscriber/article/grove/art/T077858&gt;.
Harris, Beth, and Chad Laird. “Three Futurists Balla, Severini and Boccioni.” smarthistory.Khan Academy. Web. &lt;http://smarthistory.khanacademy.org/three-futurists-art-work-by-balla-severini-and-boccioni.html&gt;

arth207-spring:

Gino Severini, Dynamic Hieroglyph of the Bal Tabarin, 1912, oil on canvas, Futurism

Severini had visited artists such as Picasso, whom greatly influenced him. Severini used the cubism technique into his style of painting. During this period, Severini’s painting became increasingly abstract and he emphasized energy by choosing images of movement in space. This painting was similar to a cubism collage and has lots of colors. The painting was of a bunch of people at a cafe. It was a representation of the Paris nightlife. The painting has many large, swinging curves of rapid motion. The woman was supposed to be swirling around. 

Ester Coen. “Severini, Gino.” Grove Art Online. Oxford Art Online. Oxford University Press. Web. 24 Apr. 2013. <http://0-www.oxfordartonline.com.library.scad.edu/subscriber/article/grove/art/T077858>.

Harris, Beth, and Chad Laird. “Three Futurists Balla, Severini and Boccioni.” smarthistory.Khan Academy. Web. <http://smarthistory.khanacademy.org/three-futurists-art-work-by-balla-severini-and-boccioni.html>

This was posted 1 year ago. It has 3 notes. .
arth207-spring:

Vladimir Tatlin, “Model for Monument to the Third International,” 1919-1920, Wood, Iron, and Glass, Russian ConstructivismThis Model for Monument to the Third International tower was one of Tatlin’s most famous works. The reason for its name was because the tower served as a propaganda center for the Communist Third International. An organization devoted to support of world revolution.
Along with his assistants, they created two of these towers and exhibited one in Petrograd (St. Petersburg) and Moscow. The towers were 5 meters high from its circular base and slanted at an angle. These towers were considered models. If the full scale tower were to be built, it would approximately be 400 meters high, taller than the Eiffel Tower. One of the reasons the full scale tower was not built was because it was too big. Tatlin could not figure out where it should be placed. The tower was mainly made of iron and glass. The spiral frame encompassed a glass cylinder, cube and cone like shape. The spiral frame created many geometric forms and was very abstract.
Lynton, Norbert. Tatlin’s Tower&#160;: Monument to Revolution. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2009. Print.

arth207-spring:

Vladimir Tatlin, “Model for Monument to the Third International,” 1919-1920, Wood, Iron, and Glass, Russian Constructivism

This Model for Monument to the Third International tower was one of Tatlin’s most famous works. The reason for its name was because the tower served as a propaganda center for the Communist Third International. An organization devoted to support of world revolution.

Along with his assistants, they created two of these towers and exhibited one in Petrograd (St. Petersburg) and Moscow. The towers were 5 meters high from its circular base and slanted at an angle. These towers were considered models. If the full scale tower were to be built, it would approximately be 400 meters high, taller than the Eiffel Tower. One of the reasons the full scale tower was not built was because it was too big. Tatlin could not figure out where it should be placed. The tower was mainly made of iron and glass. The spiral frame encompassed a glass cylinder, cube and cone like shape. The spiral frame created many geometric forms and was very abstract.

Lynton, Norbert. Tatlin’s Tower : Monument to Revolution. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2009. Print.

This was posted 1 year ago. It has 6 notes. .